anthropometaphors

translating biophilia into a love of life

Posts Tagged ‘pangolin

Happy (belated) world pangolin day!

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World pangolin day was 21 February 2015.  I dedicate this post to all pangolins and those who love, protect, and conserve them.

Adorable pangolin friend

What IS a pangolin, you might ask?

Also known as a “scaly anteater”, our buddy the pangolin is a burrowing mammal, with the singular characteristic of being covered in large overlapping scales.

While I typically favor carnivores with dangerous dentition, I adore this creature even though pangolins have no teeth.   Pangolins are carnivorous in that they eat ants, using their enormous front claws to dig into ant colonies, and incredibly long, sticky tongue to retrieve ants from within their labyrinthine underground tunnels.

Check out this video to see a pangolin (literally) digging into it’s dinner:

Sadly, the pangolin is the most trafficked mammal in the world.  While pangolins are adapted to fend off ant attacks with their scaly plates and ability to close off their ears and eyes to invasion, when they encounter a predator their defense is to roll up into a ball.  In fact, the name pangolin comes from the Malay word pengguling, meaning “something that rolls up”.

The pangolin ball

The pangolin defense posture. A ball.

While this defense works well against predators like lions, it does not protect pangolins from poachers.  Poachers easily capture pangolins, which are used in traditional medicine and as fashion accessories, or illegally traded internationally for their scales, skins, and meat.

dead pangolins

Too many dead pangolins.

You can help pangolins by (1) supporting conservation efforts that protect these delightful creatures, and (2) avoiding pangolin products.

Baby pangolins actually ride on their mothers this way.  It's true.

Baby pangolins actually ride on their mothers this way. It’s true.

Here is a list of organizations with pangolin conservation programs:

Written by morethangray

February 23, 2015 at 8:03 pm

Is the pangolin your spirit animal?

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Answer yes or no to these four questions:

  1. You sleep all day and party all night. (Partying may or may not include swinging from trees by your tail and/or eating ants).
  2. When confronted with an awkward situation, you run away and hide.
  3. You’re not so sure about that whole “pairing off” thing. #solitarylife
  4. You get so stressed out that sometimes you could just, I mean, like, die.

If you answered yes to any of these questions then — congratulations! — you might just be a pangolin person.

O hai!

(Originally from John D. Sutter’s post for CNN, “The most trafficked mammal you’ve never heard of”)

Written by morethangray

February 23, 2015 at 7:37 pm

Posted in thoughts, wildlife

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From paper to pangolins

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Awhile ago I came across this fantastic paper sculpture of a human torso, complete with removable organs, built by Horst Kiechle.  The anatomical detail is spectacular, considering Kiechle constructed the sculpture entirely from 200gms/sqm white card.  You can even build your own organs, using instructions found here.

Paper torso, by Horst Kiechle (link)

I soon found that the internet abounds with paper art crafted by science geeks, much of which is origami.  Below are some of the more interesting creations out there.

Origami is derived from the Japanese words “ori” meaning “fold” and “kami” meaning paper.  The traditional concept of origami is folding paper to create objects using only one piece of paper with no cuts or glue.

The Long-Term Effect of an MIT Education, by Brian Chan. Folded from an uncut paper square (link)

DNA (Double Helix) via Instructables (link)

And, while not officially origami (the use of two paperclips and several staples is involved), the Origami Embryo is probably the most clever tutorial on embryonic development I’ve seen.  Using three sheets of paper, Dr. Diana Darnell demonstrates how the ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm fold upon one another to create embryonic organs.  Working through this tutorial would likely help countless biology undergrads who are primarily tactile or visual learners get a better grasp (har har) on early organogenesis.

The Origami Embryo (link)

Finally, an origami post would be incomplete without at least one Eric Joisel (1956-2010) creation.  Here’s to you, beloved pangolin:

Pangolin, by Eric Joisel (link)

Gratuitous pangolin (link)

Written by morethangray

March 21, 2012 at 10:58 am

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